T-Rex Strong Tape Put To The Log Test

by | Feb 8, 2019 | Construction Products, Trending | 0 comments

When the makers of T-Rex products contacted me about testing various types of strong tape I said, “Sure. But, give me some time because I tend to use fasteners more than tape.” While T-Rex doesn’t put ‘duct tape’ on their products, you can’t help but think about duct tape when you look at a roll of its Brute Force. It’s not light gray, but it does have a definite duct tape look to it. From there though the similarities disappear, and for anyone who regularly fixes every problem they encounter with duct tape, Brute Force could be your ticket to strong tape nirvana.

Doing the Unusual

I tried using Brute Force strong tape for some unusual applications because I didn’t immediately have any of the common ones — like ductwork or a window with cracked glass. My uses for this strong tape were a bit odd. Let’s start with the log.

A few years ago I had an old mesquite tree that was leaning over the fence between my place and the neighbor’s. I got concerned that it might topple over at any time, especially in a high wind, and wipe out the fence along with anything else in its way. So, I had the tree removed. But, I saved the trunk because the heart of mesquite wood is very beautiful with reddish designs similar to what you see near the center of juniper logs. I figured I’d have the log sawn into lumber and make something from it.

Strong Tape + Winch = ?

The log sat for a long time drying out while I made a mounting point for my winch on the back of my pickup. Not that it took a long time to get the winch mounted, it took a long time to get around to it. Anyway, I wanted the log to dry out, and I needed to use the winch to load it because even dry it weighs about 500 pounds. When I got the Brute Force it was an inspired leap to try to use it to load the log onto the truck. It’s kind of like the old “hammer and nail” analogy: If you have Brute Force tape everything looks like something to use it on.

I folded a three-foot piece of the tape in half lengthwise, wrapped it around the log and tied it into a knot. I hooked the winch hook to the tape to make it the primary load point of the log. But, I was leery about whether the tape would hold as I winched the log onto the truck.

So, I wrapped a chain around the log’s center and loosely hooked it to the cable, making sure that it wouldn’t take any of the log’s weight unless catastrophe struck. Catastrophes like the tape breaking, sending the cable hook flying through the air into the rear window of the truck. Or worse, flying through the air into my face.

Watch the short video below to see what happened. Long story short, the tape held and didn’t even fray.

The Brute Force Stickiness Test

The log loading didn’t test the holding power of the tape’s adhesive. So, I decided to test it on a tarp.

I often use tarps for landscape pruning. I lay the tarp beside the plant I’m going to prune and stack all the clippings on it. Then, I drag the loaded tarp to the chipping pile. In this case my tarp had some tears in it.

So, I used the Brute Force tape to cover them, then loaded, stomped, dragged and dumped the loads.

 See the Picture Story Below

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I have a tarp that was battered by the wind, ripping out the grommets. I wrapped a piece of Brute Force around the place where the grommet failed, and cut a hole in the tape to hook a Bungee cord to it. As if by plan, severe winds arrived. I didn’t expect much, but the tape held.

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A plug in one of my drip system lines was leaking, and not where I needed water to drip. I applied T-Rex Waterproof Tape twice, using different techniques. The first time the water was on. The second time the water was off. The tape didn’t stop the leak either time.

Recently, we’ve had a lot of wind. So much that three other grommets riped out in that tarp above. I’ve repaired those grommets the same way, and they’re holding. That’s some pretty strong adhesive on that Brute Force tape. In fact, when you use it try not to let the stcky sides touch because you’ll have to work at separating them. Plus, don’t think you can tear this stuff. Plan to use a razor blade or other type of knife to cut it.

My use cases are probably not typical, but I think they demonstrate just how tough the Brute Force tape is. The waterproof tape didn’t perform for me in the drip system application, but I’m going to try it on other water-related repairs as they come up.

T-Rex also sent me its Extreme Tread tape and its Clear Repair tape which I’ll try out when I have some uses for them. If you’ve used any of these T-Rex products feel free to leave a comment and tell use your experiences.

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